frequently Asked Questions

GENERAL INFORMATION

Actually, according to NCAA rules, coaches aren’t allowed to contact or to reply to prospective student athletes until after their final event at Summer Nationals of their Junior Year of High School.

After your final event at Summer Nationals of your Junior Year OR if you make a college visit, the coach can speak with you on campus.

You are allowed to speak with a coach whenever you want, but the coach isn’t allowed to speak with you. You can also send emails and letters.

Most definitely. Each school has it’s own personality and atmosphere. Some schools are geared more toward technology while others are liberal arts or business oriented. You really want to get a feel for the school, professors and campus to make sure your college career will be a successful and enjoyable one.

Many factors dictate where you get admitted. Most of all grades and test scores. After that, the coaches can help. And so can Recruit Fencing.

To be perfectly honest, schools want the best fencer they can get. That’s common sense. However, no school can get all the top fencers in the world. There are up to 18 starting spots on any team. That is a lot of spots to fill throughout the country. Many school will fill their empty spots with fencers from beginning classes. So if you have any fencing experience at all, you’re chances of fencing in college, depending on the school, are extremely high. Recruit Fencing can help get your name to the coaches who need you.

Many schools offer scholarships or partial scholarships. For those schools who don’t, there is usually a very good student loan program. Ivy league schools don’t offer athletic scholarships of any kind. But because of the caliber of the student it takes to get into these schools, there are usually other grants and places they can pull money for students from.

Schools have early admission which means the fencer is picking 1 school to apply to early. If admitted, the fencer commits to attending this school and cannot change.

Absolutely. If a school has 5 A level fencers for 3 spots in foil, but only 1 in sabre, the coach would rather fill out the sabre squad then have a high level 3rd alternate for an already strong foil squad.

A plain walk-on player is someone who has decided to try out for the team without the coaches support. It’s possible that the coach actually knows the athlete but never actually pursued him.

Athletic recruiting is a difficult process but the hard work can pay off - earning an athletic scholarship is a life-changing experience. Athletic recruiting doesn't work the way many people think, though - coaches from college programs don't just go to tournaments to "discover" recruits. A lot of recruiting now happens online. Take an important first step in the road to a fencing scholarship by creating a recruiting profile in the Recruit Fencing. The preferred walk-on has actually been recruited by the coach who generally has offered the player a spot on the roster. The player isn’t offered any scholarship money as a freshman but there is the possibility in the future. Recruited theoretically means that the coach is trying to convince you to come to their school. However, it has come to mean that the coach has some pull as to who gets admitted over others. Generally, a recruit will get a scholarship or partial scholarship.

Team means it falls under NCAA rules and is paid for by the school. Club’s are created, funded and run by the students. They cannot fence in the NCAA Championships. But they do have their own National Club Championships.

D1 member institutions have to sponsor at least seven sports for men and seven for women (or six for men and eight for women) with two team sports for each gender. There are also contest and participant minimums for each sport, as well as scheduling criteria. For example, for sports other than football and basketball, Division I schools must play 100 percent of the minimum number of contests against Division I opponents. D2 institutions have to sponsor at least five sports for men and five for women, (or four for men and six for women), with two team sports for each gender. There are also contest and participant minimums for each sport but they are not as stringent as for DI schools. Division 2 teams usually feature a number of local or in-state student-athletes. Many Division 2 student-athletes pay for school through a combination of scholarship money, grants, student loans and employment earnings. D3 institutions have to sponsor at least five sports for men and five for women, with two team sports for each gender. There are minimum contest and participant minimums for each sport. Division 3 athletics features student-athletes who receive no financial aid related to their athletic ability and athletic departments are staffed and funded like any other department in the university. D3 athletics departments place special importance on the impact of athletics on the participants rather than on the spectators. Unique from the D1 and D2 levels, D3 institutions can contact prospective recruits by phone or mail at any point in high school. Div 1 member institutions have to sponsor at least seven sports for men and seven for women (or six for men and eight for women) with two team sports for each gender. There are also contest and participant minimums for each sport, as well as scheduling criteria. For example, for sports other than football and basketball, Division I schools must play 100 percent of the minimum number of contests against Division I opponents. Div 2 institutions have to sponsor at least five sports for men and five for women, (or four for men and six for women), with two team sports for each gender. There are also contest and participant minimums for each sport but they are not as stringent as for Div I schools. Division 2 teams usually feature a number of local or in-state student-athletes. Many Division 2 student-athletes pay for school through a combination of scholarship money, grants, student loans and employment earnings. Div 3 institutions have to sponsor at least five sports for men and five for women, with two team sports for each gender. There are minimum contest and participant minimums for each sport. Division 3 athletics features student-athletes who receive no financial aid related to their athletic ability and athletic departments are staffed and funded like any other department in the university. D3 athletics departments place special importance on the impact of athletics on the participants rather than on the spectators. Unique from the Div 1 and Div 2 levels, Div 3 institutions can contact prospective recruits by phone or mail at any point in high school. Be aware that at the Div 1 and Div 2 levels, athletics will be a huge part of your student life and you may have limited availability to college life outside of your respective sport. If sports have been an integral part of growing up, and you want to continue playing in college while receiving a first-rate education, a Div 3 school may be the right fit for you. Pretty Tough Tips Of schools with a NCAA affiliation, only Division I and Division II schools may offer athletic scholarships. Division III schools — the most prestigious institutions — are precluded from offering athletic scholarships. Schools with other affiliations, such as NAIA, offer athletic scholarships according to the policies of the associations to which they belong. Pretty Tough Tips Of schools with a NCAA affiliation, only Division I and Division II schools may offer athletic scholarships. Division III schools — the most prestigious institutions — are precluded from offering athletic scholarships. Schools with other affiliations, such as NAIA, offer athletic scholarships according to the policies of the associations to which they belong.

Title IX of the Education Amendments Act of 1972 is a federal law that states: "No person in the United States shall, on the basis of sex, be excluded from participation in, be denied the benefits of, or be subjected to discrimination under any education program or activity receiving Federal financial assistance." Athletics programs are considered educational programs and activities. There are three basic parts of Title IX as it applies to athletics: Participation: Title IX requires that women and men be provided equitable opportunities to participate in sports. Title IX does not require institutions to offer identical sports but an equal opportunity to play; Scholarships: Title IX requires that female and male student-athletes receive athletics scholarship dollars proportional to their participation; and Other benefits: Title IX requires the equal treatment of female and male student-athletes in the provisions of: (a) equipment and supplies; (b) scheduling of games and practice times; (c) travel and daily allowance/per diem; (d) access to tutoring; (e) coaching, (f) locker rooms, practice and competitive facilities; (g) medical and training facilities and services; (h) housing and dining facilities and services; (i) publicity and promotions; (j) support services and (k) recruitment of student-athletes Title IX (title 9) is a law enacted in 1972 to even out the school sports between the sexes. Since there are many 1 gender sports (football, baseball, and wrestling for example) women weren't getting equal consideration and funding for sports. Title IX was created to even the gender gap. This is why some schools (Temple and Northwestern) only have Women’s Teams. The college funding is more equitable between the genders.

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